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Vendor Diversity Portal

At Skanska, we demonstrate our commitment to build for a better society by maximizing opportunities for small and diverse firms through inclusive business practices with the goal of building capacity and strengthening business relationships.

By registering with Skanska your company will have access to local and national procurement opportunities aimed at small and diverse businesses.

To prequalify to work as a subcontractor on a project with Skanska USA Building, please click here.

Corporate Partners

Skanska partners with the following national organizations to engage diverse businesses and facilitate productive conversations with corporations on diversity best practices.

Vendor Spotlight

How Fossa Apparel became the little company that could

Frequently Asked Questions

Benefits to Registering with a Certifying Agency

Benefits to Registering with a Certifying Agency

By registering with a certifying agency, your company to have access to federal and corporate procurement opportunities and resources:

Procurement opportunities: Having access to corporate and government agency databases will provide you with proactive information to strengthen your business development. Additionally, your company’s information will be available to purchasers who are looking for your specific product or service.

Access to loan programs: Borrowers of loans backed by certain government agencies such as the Small Business Administration, will have greater access to capital. Additionally, third-party organizations can help prepare loan applications.

Networking opportunities: Corporations and government agencies regularly host networking opportunities for small and diverse firms. This can allow you to meet decision makers, potential business partners and organizations to benefit your company.

Training and Development: In order to build capacity and strengthen relationships, corporations and government agencies host free training and development series and events. This allows your company to engage in ongoing improvement.

More information on certifying agencies can be found below.

Certifying Agencies

Certifying Agencies

The National Minority Supplier Development Council advances business opportunities for certified minority business enterprises and connects them to corporate members.

As defined by NMSDC a Minority Business Enterprise (MBE) must fulfill the following criteria for certification:

  1. United States citizens.
  2. Minority businesses must be at least 51% minority-owned operated and controlled. For the purposes of NMSDC’s program, a minority group member is an individual who is at least 25% Asian, Black, Hispanic or Native American. Minority eligibility is established via a combination of screenings, interviews and site visits. Ownership, in the case of a publicly-owned business, means that at least 51% of the stock is owned by one or more minority group members.
  3. Must be a profit enterprise and physically located in the U. S. or its trust territories.
  4. Management and daily operations must be exercised by the minority ownership member(s).

Women’s Business Enterprise National Council (WBENC) is the largest certifier of women-owned businesses in the U.S. and a leading advocate for women business owners and entrepreneurs.

As defined by WBENC a Women's Business Enterprise (WBE) is an independent business concern that is at least 51 percent owned and controlled by one or more women who are U.S. citizens or Legal Resident Aliens; whose business formation and principal place of business are in the US or its territories; and whose management and daily operation is controlled by one or more of the women owners.


National Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT) Chamber of Commerce (NGLCC) is the business voice of the LGBT community, the largest advocacy organization dedicated to expanding economic opportunities and advancements for LGBT people, and the exclusive certifying body for LGBT-owned businesses.

As defined by the NGLCC, a Certified LGBTBE must fulfill the following criteria:

  • Majority (at least 51%) owned, operated, managed, and controlled by an LGBT person or persons who are either U.S. citizens or lawful permanent residents
  • Exercises independence from any non-LGBT business enterprise
  • Has its principal place of business (headquarters) in the United States
  • Has been formed as a legal entity in the United States

Disability:IN certifies disability-owned business enterprises (DOBE) and veteran-disability owned businesses and links them to organizations looking to diversify their supply chains.

As defined by Disability:IN, a DOBE is a for-profit business that is at least 51% owned, managed and controlled by a person with a disability regardless of whether or not that business owner employs person(s) with a disability.


U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA), an independent federal government agency, maintains and strengthens the nation’s economy by enabling the establishment and vitality of small businesses and by assisting in the economic recovery of communities after disasters.


SBA definitions and certifications

Small Business Concern (SBC)/Small Business Enterprise (SBE): Independently owned and operated small business as defined by SBA criteria (http://www.sba.gov/) & (http://www.sam.gov/).

Small Disadvantaged Business (SDB): A small business concern that is at least 51 percent owned by one or more individuals who are both socially and economically disadvantaged. This can include a publicly-owned business that has at least 51 percent of its stock unconditionally owned by one or more socially and economically disadvantaged individuals and whose management and daily business is controlled by one or more such individuals (http://www.sba.gov/).

Women-Owned Small Business (WOSB): Small business with at least 51 percent ownership, control and management by one or more women who are U.S. citizens or resident aliens (http://www.sba.gov/) & (http://www.sam.gov/).

HUBZone Small Business Concern (HUBZone): Small business based on the geographical area where the business is located and where 35% of the employees reside. The company must be small, located in a HUBZone (Historically Underutilized Business Zone), owned and controlled by one or more U.S. citizens, and at least 35% of its employees reside in a HUBZone (www.sba.gov/hubzone)

Veteran-Owned Small Business (VOSB): Small business with at least 51 percent ownership, control and management by one or more honorably discharged veterans (www.vetbiz.va.gov).

Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business (SDVOSB): Small business with at least 51 percent ownership, control and management by one or more honorably discharged disabled veterans (www.vetbiz.va.gov) & (http://www.usbln.org/).

Supplier Code of Conduct

Supplier Code of Conduct

Skanska strives to achieve mutually beneficial supplier relationships built on common values and expected behaviors. The Skanska Code of Conduct (our Code) outlines the behaviors we expect from our employees. This Skanska Supplier Code of Conduct (our Supplier Code) contains relevant portions of our Code that apply to you as an important part of our supply chain. We encourage our suppliers to engage in constructive dialogue with us regarding our Supplier Code and doing business together.

Contacts

Amie Kromis

National Director of Vendor Diversity

John Downing

Regional Vendor Diversity Manager

Contact for Oregon and Washington.

Cassandra Manansala

Regional Vendor Diversity Manager

Contact for Arizona and California.

Tiffany Peay

Regional Vendor Diversity Manager

Contact for Texas, Tennessee and Ohio.

Maritza Burgos

Regional Vendor Diversity Manager

Contact for Florida and Georgia.

Tyra Redus

Regional Vendor Diversity Director

Contact for North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania and Washington, D.C.

Donna Licciardi

Regional Vendor Diversity Director

Contact for New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, and Connecticut.

For general questions, please email Contact

Last updated: 9/28/2020