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Poplar Island Habitat Restoration Project - Phase II

  • Poplar Island
  • Poplar Island
  • Poplar Island

The project consisted of constructing a dike perimeter with a longitudinal dike to divert the upland cells from the wet land cells.  The total quantity of stone placed was 335,000 tons of armor and quarry run stone. The total length of slope protection was 12,000 linear feet and 11,500 linear feet of Toe Dike as detailed below.  A total of 1,800,000 cubic yards of dredged sand was stockpiled and utilized for dike construction.

The project restored the original Poplar Island that had eroded throughout the 20thcentury.  The completed project has rebuilt the island to its original shape, and it provides a habitat for large birds such as ospreys, bald eagles, and more.

The construction of the Toe Dike consisted of  placing quarry stone on top of a geotextile, a complete underwater operation, which was followed by placing 2,000-lb. armor stones on top of the quarry run. 

The Main Dike was constructed with a mass of sand that was previously dredged and stockpiled within the construction area in a contained environment.  The sand was transported by truck and placed by a dozer inside the Toe Dike.

Immediately following the Dike fill, a layer of geotextile fabric was installed and then overlayed with bedding stones with a 250-lb.underlayer placed on top.

The final two layers consisted of 3,000 lb. pieces of armor stones placed perpendicular to the slope and with a 3-point contact to the adjacent stone.

The top of the dikes was then shaped and a roadway of gravel was built.  All other horizontal and sloping areas were protected by a ground cover and seeds.

The jobsite was located in an environmentally sensitive wildlife area. American Bald Eagles nested on a nearby island approximately 200 feet outside of the construction area. Time of year restrictions were applied to the jobsite regarding access to the work area.

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